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Causes Of Cavities And Role Of Dietary Factors

Author : danzel rod


Despite the reduction in caries in many countries has been largely related to the use of fluoride and improved dental hygiene, eating habits also play a role in the development of caries.

Fermentable Carbohydrates:

For many years to prevent cavities message was "not eating too much sugar or sugary foods". In recent decades sugar intake in many countries has remained constant whilst caries levels have declined. This suggests that when you practice good oral hygiene (eg. Regular brushing using fluoride toothpaste) expresses less the role of sugar in tooth decay.

The council replace sugar with starchy foods (starch) to prevent cavities is of questionable value. We now know that any food containing fermentable carbohydrates (that these are sugar or starch) can contribute to tooth decay. This means that, like sweets and candies, pasta, rice, chips, fruit and even bread can begin the process of demineralization. For example, a study that observed the acid production ability of various starchy foods including pasta, rice and bread, found that these foods produced the same amount of acid a 10% sucrose solution (sugar table). Another study found that acid formation in plaque after eating bread or potato chips was greater and lasted longer than after drinking sucrose.

Food Characteristics:

Physical characteristics of a food, especially how it sticks to the teeth also affect the process of decay. Foods that stick to teeth increase the risk of tooth decay compared to foods that are removed from the mouth quickly. For example potato chips and biscuits stick to teeth longer than other foods such as candy and treats. This may be due to the candies and sweets that contain soluble sugars disappear more quickly by saliva. The longer you stay the carbohydrate-containing foods around the teeth, the more time bacteria have to produce acid and the greater the possibility of demineralization.

Frequency of Consumption:

There are debates about the relative importance of frequency of consumption of carbohydrates and their relation to decay. As in the case of the relationship between diet and caries, the link seems to weaken with the adoption of good oral hygiene and fluoride.

Whenever a food bites or sipping a drink containing carbohydrates, any decay-causing bacteria is present in teeth have begins to produce acids, initiating demineralization. This process continues for 20 or 30 minutes after eating or drinking, or longer if food debris trapped locally or remains in the mouth. In between different various intake of food or drink saliva acts to neutralize the acids and assist in the remineralization process. If you eat or drink frequently, do not give you time to polish the teeth to decay completely and remineralized start to occur. So eat and drink continuously throughout the day is not advisable. The best advice is to limit the number of intake (food intake and / or drinks) with carbohydrates to no more than 6 times a day and make sure they brush their teeth using fluoride toothpaste twice a day.

Baby bottle tooth decay or nursing caries is a disease in which the children's teeth are damaged due to frequent and prolonged exposure to beverages with sugars, usually from a bottle. In particular, the problems increase when the children go to bed with bottles of formula or juice. The flow of saliva is greatly reduced during sleep and sweet liquids remain around the teeth for long periods of time. This creates the perfect environment for the development of dental caries.

Protective Foods:

Some foods help protect against cavities. For example, cheeses increase the flow of saliva. Cheese also contains calcium, phosphate and casein, a milk protein that protects against demineralisation. Finishing a meal with a piece of cheese helps counteract the action of acids produced by carbohydrate-rich foods consumed in the same meal. Milk also contains calcium, phosphate and casein, and milk sugar, lactose, is less cariogenic (caries causing) than other sugars. But tooth decay found in children who were breast-fed and who ask frequently.

There are some products available from the Oral B's wide range which really helps us in leading a hassle free dental healthy life.


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The author is an educationist by profession and has a good amount of experience in this field where he will help you out with the information on various things like Oral B and Oral Care.

Article Source:
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Tags:   Dental Health, Dental Cavities, Oral B

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Submitted : 2011-07-16    Word Count : 721    Times Viewed: 761